Foolishness in geoffrey chaucers pardoners tale

Then, more often than not, in the following tale the character who felt wronged in some way will take judgment into his or her own hands by telling their own tale in a way that avenges their hurt feelings or slandered estate.

Foolishness in geoffrey chaucers pardoners tale

Then, more often than not, in the following tale the character who felt wronged in some way will take judgment into his or her own hands by telling their own tale in a way that avenges their hurt feelings or slandered estate.

What then would happen if a character told a tale and did not receive a payback tale? The first is the ultimate repercussions of the deceiver.

She ends up associating with a being that possesses a demonic name, Damian, and the tale later suggests that she pays a severe price for her actions. The second form of repercussion comes to those who allow themselves to be deceived, also known as blind faith.

In each tale, there are repercussions for both the deceiver and the deceived. Aside from the initial slur about the foolishness, or possibly brilliance as suggested by his friends, of an older gentleman taking a young bride as his wife, the Merchant ends up taking a girl named May in wedlock.

Since Damian is often a literary name for a being with an innate presence of evil about it, one could easily infer what is about to happen. Even when clearly caught, May continues to deceive her husband.

By the end of the tale, it seems that her repercussion is to carry and bear a demon child. Symbolically, the affair with Damian suggests an affair with evil.

Since the Pardoner is a member of the clergy, he is bound to a life working in the light of God and the Church. While the Pardoner knows he is being hypocritically deceitful in his preaching to man, it was suggested that he is also being deceitful toward God because of his continuous fraud in the name of God.

In this circle, the Pardoner would pay for his sins of betrayal against God, whether he realized consciously what he was doing or not. Dante then asks Virgil why usury was a sin. Because of his ultimate deceit against God, we conclude that the Pardoner would pay a bigger price than if he were to only deceive man.

However, while Chaucer shows that the implications of being a deceiver are severe, he also subtly suggests that the implications of a blind believer could be just as bad. To those who allow themselves to be deceived, those who believe what they are told without taking into consideration their own thoughts, and those who are fearful of losing their easy lives as blind sheep led by untrustworthy shepherds, Chaucer suggests foolishness in the minds of the deceived.

Chaucer states that those who have characteristics of unintelligible conclusions in matters that are clearly defined will never change their ways. These foolish people who allow themselves to be deceived are fearful of a life outside of their lifelong deceit.

Repercussion in The Canterbury Tales

Just as Chaucer has suggested all those who live a life deceived do, eventually January is swayed into believing that his wife was merely wrestling so that he may gain his sight once again.

Obviously deceived by his wife, January disregards all that he saw. Even though Pluto opened up his physical eyes so that his mind could see the trickery that was displayed before him, January did not succeed in seeing past the blindness of his mind. This demon child will be his son whom he thinks is of his own blood, but is in fact not.

He claims that those who are deceived can clearly be told that they are being deceived, but ultimately they will continue to live a life as a sham and a lie. Chaucer reflects that those who live by false terms will live a life like January, blinded by faith and thus blinded in the mind.

It seems that these people are worse than the Pardoner, because not only can they clearly see the false testimonies, they are also told of the false testimonies by the preacher giving the testimony. Here, we see the repercussion of those who are deceived. It seems that only the Host is bold enough to stand up against the misdoing that the Pardoner clearly just displayed.

Many wonder that if what the Pardoner says about his tricks is true, what ultimate meaning does this give to their life? For many, the answer is little to no meaning.Canterbury Tales, Pardoner's Tale, and Wife of Bath's Tale and 1 other.

STUDY. PLAY.

Expert Answers

sarcasm, humor, and ridicule to attack human foolishness and flaws. Irony. An event in which the opposite of what is expected happens; a remark where the meaning is the opposite of what is said (sarcasm is a form of irony).

Geoffrey Chaucer is both the. Foolishness in Geoffrey Chaucer's Pardoner's Tale PAGES 2. WORDS 1, View Full Essay. More essays like this: geoffrey chaucer, pardoners tale, deception and foolishness. Not sure what I'd do without @Kibin - Alfredo Alvarez, student @ Miami University geoffrey chaucer, pardoners tale, deception and foolishness.

Foolishness in geoffrey chaucers pardoners tale

Not sure what I'd do. Geoffrey Chaucer (/ His editions of Chaucers Works in and were the first major contributions to the existence of a widely recognised Chaucerian canon. The famous Plowman's Tale did not enter Thynne's Works until the second, , edition.

Deception and Foolishness in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Pardoner's Tale PAGES 2. WORDS 1, View Full Essay.

The Pardoner's Tale - Wikipedia

More essays like this: geoffrey chaucer, the pardoners tale, deception and foolishness. Not sure what I'd do without @Kibin - Alfredo Alvarez, student @ Miami University geoffrey chaucer, the pardoners tale, deception and foolishness.

The Tale of the Pardoner in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales Essay - A Look at the Pardoner: the Genius of Chaucer The Canterbury Tales is a literary masterpiece in which the brilliant author Geoffrey Chaucer sought out to accomplish various goals.

Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - Comparing The Pardoners Tale and The Nun's Priest's Tale In “The Pardoner’s Tale”, a distinct relationship can be made between the character of the Pardoner and his tale of three friends.

More about The Pardoner, a Symbol of Greed in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. Women In Geoffrey Chaucer's.

Geoffrey Chaucer - Wikipedia