The hypocrisy of american slavery through the eyes of fredrick douglass

The false form of religion, or what the author explained in one of the important quotes in The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: Covey, and is a complete bastardization of the true ideals behind genuine Christian thought.

The hypocrisy of american slavery through the eyes of fredrick douglass

President, Friends and Fellow Citizens: He who could address this audience without a quailing sensation, has stronger nerves than I have. I do not remember ever to have appeared as a speaker before any assembly more shrinkingly, nor with greater distrust of my ability, than I do this day.

A feeling has crept over me, quite unfavorable to the exercise of my limited powers of speech. The task before me is one which requires much previous thought and study for its proper performance. I know that apologies of this sort are generally considered flat and unmeaning.

I trust, however, that mine will not be so considered.

The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro

Should I seem at ease, my appearance would much misrepresent me. The little experience I have had in addressing public meetings, in country schoolhouses, avails me nothing on the present occasion.

The papers and placards say, that I am to deliver a 4th [of] July oration. This certainly sounds large, and out of the common way, for it is true that I have often had the privilege to speak in this beautiful Hall, and to address many who now honor me with their presence.

But neither their familiar faces, nor the perfect gage I think I have of Corinthian Hall, seems to free me from embarrassment.

“What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?”

The fact is, ladies and gentlemen, the distance between this platform and the slave plantation, from which I escaped, is considerable—and the difficulties to be overcome in getting from the latter to the former, are by no means slight.

That I am here to-day is, to me, a matter of astonishment as well as of gratitude. You will not, therefore, be surprised, if in what I have to say. I evince no elaborate preparation, nor grace my speech with any high sounding exordium.

The Hypocrisy of American Slavery A courageous, compassionate, and independent twenty-six-year-old African-American woman writer.
50 Documents That Tell America’s Story Douglass described her as a kind and tender-hearted woman, who treated him "as she supposed one human being ought to treat another".
Kindred (novel) - Wikipedia President, Friends and Fellow Citizens:
Frederick Douglass - Wikipedia Pro-Choice Reasoning Response to Common Pro-Choice Views Some arguments against the pro-life side are directed to the abortion issue itself, while others focus more on the perceived hypocrisy or insensitivity of pro-lifers.
The embedded audio player requires a modern internet browser. You should visit Browse Happy and update your internet browser today!

With little experience and with less learning, I have been able to throw my thoughts hastily and imperfectly together; and trusting to your patient and generous indulgence, I will proceed to lay them before you.

This, for the purpose of this celebration, is the 4th of July. It is the birthday of your National Independence, and of your political freedom.

The Hypocrisy of American Slavery - Frederick Douglass

This, to you, is what the Passover was to the emancipated people of God. It carries your minds back to the day, and to the act of your great deliverance; and to the signs, and to the wonders, associated with that act, and that day.

This celebration also marks the beginning of another year of your national life; and reminds you that the Republic of America is now 76 years old. I am glad, fellow-citizens, that your nation is so young.

Seventy-six years, though a good old age for a man, is but a mere speck in the life of a nation. Three score years and ten is the allotted time for individual men; but nations number their years by thousands.

According to this fact, you are, even now, only in the beginning of your national career, still lingering in the period of childhood. I repeat, I am glad this is so.

There is hope in the thought, and hope is much needed, under the dark clouds which lower above the horizon. The eye of the reformer is met with angry flashes, portending disastrous times; but his heart may well beat lighter at the thought that America is young, and that she is still in the impressible stage of her existence.

May he not hope that high lessons of wisdom, of justice and of truth, will yet give direction to her destiny?It follows the full transcript of Frederick Douglass' What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?

Through his discussions of religion that are interspersed throughout The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, the reader gets the sense that slavery and true Christianity are opposing forces and one cannot be present while the other exists. Not only is the simultaneous existence of the true version Christianity with slavery impossible. Frederick Douglass was born in slavery as Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey near Easton in Talbot County, Maryland. He was not sure of the exact year of his birth, but he knew that it was or Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave: Written by Himself study guide contains a biography of Frederick Douglass, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

address, also called The Hypocrisy of American Slavery speech, delivered in the Corinthian Hall at Rochester, New York - July 5, Aug 07,  · Frederick Douglass in his narrative, “Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass,” discusses the role of religion, Christianity in particular, which was written in literature known as the bible had two versions: true Christianity and the white Christianity that helped in strengthening slavery.

North American Slavery vs. Latin American Slavery: A Comparative Look at Frederick Douglass and Juan Francisco Manzano When we assess the evils of slavery, we typically think of the North American slaves plight. Frederick Douglass (born Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey; c.

February – February 20, ) was an American social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and monstermanfilm.com escaping from slavery in Maryland, he became a national leader of the abolitionist movement in Massachusetts and New York, gaining note for his oratory and incisive antislavery writings.

BASIC PHILOSOPHY. A COLLECTION OF FUNDAMENTAL IDEAS & A GUIDE FOR THE PHILOSOPHICALLY PERPLEXED. Also. TOPICS FOR LIBERAL EDUCATION TOPICS FOR NEW EDUCATION.

A Word of Caution. Few statements are true in all respects or for all plausible interpretations. This is especially true of interesting or significant statements and arises from the .

The hypocrisy of american slavery through the eyes of fredrick douglass

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave: Written by Himself study guide contains a biography of Frederick Douglass, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

Download-Theses